Push Poll Funny Examples | So Cute Together?

Okay, so you're big into the political scene and look forward to opportunities to share your opinion when called during the polling season. But can you tell if it's a push poll or not, which, by the way, are illegal in most states? For those who believe they can tell the difference between a valid poll and a push poll from across the room, you just might want to take a second look at what's being asked. After all, it's all in the wording.

The way push polls work is that, during a campaign or other data collection process, if a random sampling of phone calls demonstrates that a specific candidate is not scoring high enough, additional calls will be made. Although appearing to include simple questions, in fact, statements are made in such a way as to influence outcomes. Frequently, this results in higher scores for the candidate.


An example was during Bush's 2000 campaign in South Carolina when telephoned voters were asked if they were likely to support McCain's candidacy "if they knew he was the father of an illegitimate black baby." Of course, he wasn't, but what this did was plant a seed of doubt prior to the time voters cast their ballots for the primary election. More recently the push poll used against US Senate candidate Jim Webb that asked voters if they would still vote for him "if they knew he worked for the Regan administration."

Although this type of polling is discouraged by law, its use has even filtered into schools where young, future voters and politicians use it to sway peer opinions of proposed district decisions. For example, in one school female students were asked by peers if they would support the uniform dress code "if they knew the proposed design would be mid-calf skirts and turtlenecks." Of course, this was not the proposed designed, but so many students and parents attended the board meeting in distress that the proposal was squelched.

Today's polls target kids are also designed with choices. Even though still influential, just as with political polls they are often masqueraded so well they are difficult to detect. For example, in a popular online poll targeted at younger people the site asked "Are Nicole Richie and Joel Madden a cute couple?" The options were: "Yes, so cute together;" "They're okay, but I like Hillary more;" and "Nah, it's probably a publicity stunt." In viewing the responses it's easy to tell that this is a push pull where kids are looking at the two as a potential couple where, actually, they're already married with a baby.

In a push poll information isn't actually collected or used to find out voter opinion on the topic in question. It's actually used to sway or influence voters so that they will vote the way the initiator wants them to. Much like marketing and advertising in business, it's to see what it takes to change voter opinion and, today, every age group is targeted. So, before you vote next time ask yourself if the questions asked are trying to find out what you really think or are trying to make you change your mind.
Okay, so you're big into the political scene and look forward to opportunities to share your opinion when called during the polling season. But can you tell if it's a push poll or not, which, by the way, are illegal in most states? For those who believe they can tell the difference between a valid poll and a push poll from across the room, you just might want to take a second look at what's being asked. After all, it's all in the wording.

The way push polls work is that, during a campaign or other data collection process, if a random sampling of phone calls demonstrates that a specific candidate is not scoring high enough, additional calls will be made. Although appearing to include simple questions, in fact, statements are made in such a way as to influence outcomes. Frequently, this results in higher scores for the candidate.

An example was during Bush's 2000 campaign in South Carolina when telephoned voters were asked if they were likely to support McCain's candidacy "if they knew he was the father of an illegitimate black baby." Of course, he wasn't, but what this did was plant a seed of doubt prior to the time voters cast their ballots for the primary election. More recently the push poll used against US Senate candidate Jim Webb that asked voters if they would still vote for him "if they knew he worked for the Regan administration."

Although this type of polling is discouraged by law, its use has even filtered into schools where young, future voters and politicians use it to sway peer opinions of proposed district decisions. For example, in one school female students were asked by peers if they would support the uniform dress code "if they knew the proposed design would be mid-calf skirts and turtlenecks." Of course, this was not the proposed designed, but so many students and parents attended the board meeting in distress that the proposal was squelched.

Today's polls target kids are also designed with choices. Even though still influential, just as with political polls they are often masqueraded so well they are difficult to detect. For example, in a popular online poll targeted at younger people the site asked "Are Nicole Richie and Joel Madden a cute couple?" The options were: "Yes, so cute together;" "They're okay, but I like Hillary more;" and "Nah, it's probably a publicity stunt." In viewing the responses it's easy to tell that this is a push pull where kids are looking at the two as a potential couple where, actually, they're already married with a baby.

In a push poll information isn't actually collected or used to find out voter opinion on the topic in question. It's actually used to sway or influence voters so that they will vote the way the initiator wants them to. Much like marketing and advertising in business, it's to see what it takes to change voter opinion and, today, every age group is targeted. So, before you vote next time ask yourself if the questions asked are trying to find out what you really think or are trying to make you change your mind.
Copyright 2012-2019 CallerCenter.com